Month: July 2015

Accident at work – worker loses two toes

An employee of a brick manufacturing company has suffered the partial loss of two toes in an incident involving machinery used to break up clay. The events occurred at the brick manufacturer’s headquarters in Blockley, Gloucestershire.

Accident at work – safe guards not in place

In an investigation led by the health and Safety Executive, Stroud Magistrates’ Court heard that the un-named 45-year old male worker sustained serious injuries to his right leg (including the partial loss of two toes) after stepping onto unguarded machinery.

The machinery in question had recently been installed. A risk assessment had identified the need to install guards (or barriers), but the advice had not been followed and measures to prevent an accident had not been taken.

Company fined for safety failings

Northcot Brick Limited was found guilty of breaching the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974. The company was fined £18,500 and ordered to pay costs of £7,500

HSE Inspector Ann Linden commented:

“This incident would not have happened if simple precautions
such as putting up a barrier or guard had been in place.
Safeguards cannot be relaxed because a machine
is being commissioned or tested.”

Accident at work compensation – expert help

If you have been injured in an accident that was not your fault in the work place, you could be entitled to maximum personal injury compensation. If you believe that your employer could have done more to prevent your injury at work, speak to us today – we offer you a FREE on-obligation consultation.

Discover today whether you have a claim, call 0800 888 6 888 or email info@hh-law.co.uk

Source: Health and Safety Executive

Accident at work – fractured finger

A worker has sustained severe injuries to his left hand following an accident at work. The unnamed man was attempting to remove a blockage in a sugar dispensing machine when the valve clamped shut, fracturing and lacerating his finger.

Dangerous machinery – unidentified risk

In an investigation led by the Health and Safety Executive, Reading Magistrates’ Court heard that on the day of the incident, sugar had clumped in a dispensing chute at the condiments factory in Berkshire. The employee cleared the blockage by hand, and sugar immediately rushed out of the chute. The sugar fell onto the pre-set scales beneath – when the target weight was reached, the machinery clamped shut, trapping the man’s hand.

The man required two pins in his hand and can no longer straighten the damaged finger.

Company fine – health and safety breaches

English Provender Company Limited was found guilty of breaching the Health and Safety at work Regulations 1999, and was also found guilty of breaching the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998. The firm was fined £15,000 and ordered to pay costs of £1,178

HSE inspector Leon Donovan commented:

“English Provender Company should have carried out a proper assessment of the risks involved in the operation and maintenance
of their sugar dispensing machine.

“This would have identified the issues that lead to this unfortunate accident which could have been avoided if the company had fitted a
simple inexpensive fixed guard to prevent access to a
dangerous automatic sliding sluice valve.”

Accident at work – expert advice and guidance

If you have been injured in an accident that was not your fault in the work place, you could be entitled to personal injury compensation. Whatever your circumstances, we offer instant advice and professional guidance. For further information, and to discover the amount of compensation that you could be owed, contact us today for your FREE no-obligation consultation on 0800 888 6 888 or email info@hh-law.co.uk

Source: Health and Safety Executive

Broken back at work

Oak View Tree Specialists Limited has been fined after a 19 year old employee suffered potentially life-changing injuries due to lack of training.

Broken back – dumper truck over turned

In an investigation led by the Health and Safety Executive, Basildon Magistrates’ Court heard that the unnamed man had received only several minutes training on the equipment when the dumper truck he was operating overturned. Furthermore, the man did not have a driving licence and nor was he wearing a seatbelt.

The man broke his back in the incident. He was airlifted to hospital, where he underwent months of rehabilitation – he may never be able to walk unaided again.

Oak View Tree Specialists fined

Oak View Tree Specialists Limited, of Rayleigh, Essex, failed to supply adequate staff training and was found guilty of breaching the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998. The company was fined £3,000 and was ordered to pay costs of £1,500.

HSE Inspector Keith Waller commented:

“This was entirely an avoidable incident. The defendant failed to take reasonably practicable measures because they allowed their employee to operate a dangerous item of plant machinery with only the very minimum of training.

“It is not acceptable to put drivers into vehicles that they have not previously operated, or without the necessary training by a qualified and competent instructor.”

Accident at work compensation

If you have been injured in an accident that was not your fault in the work place, you could be entitled to personal injury compensation. We offer you a FREE no-obligation consultation, during which we aim to answer all of your queries about your claim. Find out today how we could help you, call 0800 888 6 888 or email info@hh-law.co.uk

Source: Health and Safety Executive

Two year old loses fingertips

Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council has been fined following an incident in which a two year old boy suffered severe injuries to his left hand whilst visiting Springfield park in Heywood, near Rochdale.

Fingertips severed in park gate hinge

An investigation led by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found that on the day of the incident, the toddler had entered the park with his mother and three other children. The boy was playing close to the gate when the gate was closed – due to the child’s young age, he was unable to describe the event in detail, but the assumption is that the gate was pushed closed by another child.

The boy’s fingertips were inside the hinge of the gate. The ‘guillotine’ effect severed two of the boy’s fingertips.

Safety mechanism removed

Trafford Magistrates’ Court heard that a locking mechanism had been removed from the gate 12 to 18 months prior to the incident. The park had been inspected several times by members of Rochdale Council during this period, but no action was taken to replace the stopper.

Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council was found guilty of breaching the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974. The council was fined £13,000 and ordered to pay costs of £1,317.

HSE Inspector Emily Osborne commented:

“Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council failed to make sure health and safety at the playpark met the minimum legal standards and put children visiting the play area at Springfield Park at risk over a long period of time. The risk of trapping fingers in the gate was not identified and no prior action was taken by the council to stop this from happening.

“It is simply not good enough to not identify a serious risk and do nothing to prevent it. A guard should have been fitted over the dangerous part of the gate or the stopper should have been replaced. Instead, a two-year-old boy suffered injuries that are likely to affect him for life as a result of the council’s failings.”

Personal injury compensation – expert advice

If you have been injured in accident that was not your fault, you could be entitled to personal injury compensation. We offer you a FREE no-obligation consultation – discuss your claim with us today and discover the amount of compensation that you could be owed.

For further information, speak to a member of our dedicated team or request a call back on 0800 888 6 888 or email info@hh-law.co.uk

Source: Health and Safety Executive

Liverpool: dog attack national hotspot

Liverpool dog attacks – statistics released by the Health and Social Care Information Centre show that Primary Care Trusts in the Liverpool area have dealt with consistently high and increasing rates of dog attacks. One in six dog attacks takes place in the north west of England.

The report shows a 6% rise in the year on year number of dog attacks in Liverpool – similar high numbers of dog attacks (with increasing rates) are only known elsewhere in the UK at county level, with Buckinghamshire and Hampshire also ranking highly.

Kennel Club Secretary Caroline Kisko has recently spoken out about the issue:

“Dog bites are clearly a public health issue, and to ensure that both public
safety and dog welfare remain paramount we need to make changes to
this country’s strategy on dogs which are allowed to be out
of control. It is absolutely crucial that we get it
right to avoid a further increase in
dog bite incidents.”

Liverpool dog bites – children at risk

Children are at increased risk of sustaining a serious injury from a dog attack. The 0-9 age group has the highest rate of admission for plastic surgery to the face and neck following a dog attack.

In June 2015, Merseyside police launched a dog bite awareness campaign aimed at raising awareness in primary school children. A series of summer events has been planned, including school visits.

Inspector Phelps of the Merseyside Police force commented:

“They are really simple messages to reduce child bites in the home. Don’t
let your child wake a sleeping dog. Don’t let your child interfere
with a dog while it’s being fed and when a child approaches
a dog, speak to the owner first and ask
is it OK to stroke the dog.”

Dog attacks on Liverpool postal workers

Merseyside Police and Royal Mail have joined forces to increase awareness of penalty fares in place for dog owners who do not take reasonable measures to prevent attacks.

Postal worker Claire Millen required several stitches following a dog attack at a Liverpool home in September 2014. An average of eight postal workers suffer dog attacks each day across the UK – almost 3,000 attacks were reported in the year ending April 2015.

Ms Millen said:

“It was a terrifying experience and I still have the physical scars to prove it.
I am now scared to take my children out to the park in
case there are dogs running around there.

“That’s why I fully support Royal Mail’s Dog Awareness Week 2015 campaign
and I would urge owners to make sure their dogs are safely in
the house and under their control whenever
anyone calls at the door.”

Recent changes to the law mean that a dog owner whose animal causes fatal injuries in an attack could now face an increased prison sentence of 14 years. Where the injuries are severe but not fatal, the dog owner may now face up to five years in prison.

Dog bite compensation – speak to the experts

If you have been injured in a dog attack, you could be entitled to maximum personal injury compensation. We understand that you may have questions regarding your claim – that is why we offer you a FREE no-obligation consultation. For further information about dog bite compensation, and to discover how we could help you, speak to our dedicated team of solicitors today on 0800 888 6 888 or email info@hh-law.co.uk

Sources:
hscic.gov.uk
The Kennel Club
Merseyside Police

Injury at work – worker loses finger

A carpenter has suffered serious injuries to his hand following safety failings that led to an incident with a rotary saw.

Finger amputated – what happened?

Weymouth Magistrates’ Court heard that George Warren Heath, aged 19 at the time of the incident, was preparing lengths of wood for use as doorframes. Part of the process involved operating a ‘flip over saw’. However, the saw was not fitted with a safety guard, and three of Mr Heath’s fingers came into contact with the spinning blade – one of the fingers was badly damaged and required amputation.

An investigation led by the Health and Safety Executive discovered that although Mr Heath’s employer had provided safety guards, adequate measures were not taken to ensure that those guards were in place.

Sugar Construction Limited was found guilty of breaching the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998. The construction firm was fined £1,500 and was also required to pay full costs of £1,543.

HSE Inspector James Powell commented:

“This case emphasises the need for employers to ensure that equipment is properly maintained to ensure that dangerous parts of the machinery cannot be accessed and that a risk assessment is carried out covering
all foreseeable uses and operations of the work equipment.”

“Table saws should not be used unless the appropriate safety devices and protection appliances are used. Workers should be provided with the information, instruction, training and supervision as is appropriate
with the tool that is being used.”

Accident at work compensation – speak to the experts

If you have been injured in an accident at work that was not your fault, you may be entitled to maximum personal injury compensation. Depending on the nature of your injury, our advice and guidance may extend into arranging your rehabilitation.

Our dedicated team of personal injury solicitors offers a FREE no-obligation consultation – discover today whether you have a claim. For instant answers and peace of mind, call 0800 888 6 888 or email info@hh-law.co.uk

Source: Health and Safety Executive