Tag: attacked by dog

Dog Bites | Four children admitted to hospital each day

The NHS has revealed there have been around 8,000 children under 16 admitted to hospital with dog bite injuries in the last five years.

8,000 hospital admissions

Of the 8,000 hospital admissions for dog bite injuries, over 70% involved children under the age of nine and over 1000 took place in 2015-16 alone.

Be Dog Smart Week

As a result of the data, UK charity Dogs Trust launched their first ever Be Dog Smart Week, which took place last week (19th-25th June). The aim of the week was to teach children how to stay safe around the much loved family pet.

The charity has apparently received around 150 calls since Christmas from parents wanting to give up their family pet as their children do not know how to interact safely with dogs.

Dogs Trust offered some useful advice and tips throughout the week, as well as an easy to read infographic (see below) and workshops in schools throughout the UK.

Head of education at Dogs Trust, Hollie Sevenoaks, says:

“Be Dog Smart Week is an important initiative that will help us continue to spread fundamental dog safety advice to thousands of children and parents across the UK.

“Whether your family owns a dog or not, 33 percent of children in the UK will encounter a dog every single day. Whilst being around dogs can have so many wonderful benefits for young people, the simple fact is that any dog can bite or snap if worried, scared or hurt.

“Many of these bites are preventable, and at Dogs Trust, we believe educating children, parents, grandparents, friends, teachers, guardians, and dog owners about dog safety, is the first step to preventing such incidents.”

Compensation following a dog bite – expert advice

If you have been attacked by a dog, even where the dog did not cause physical harm, you may be entitled to compensation. More information can be found via our ‘Dog Bite Claims’ page.

Whatever your experience involving a dog bite, speak to our expert team of personal injury solicitors today to discover how we could help you. For further information, call 0800 888 6 888 or email info@hampsonhughes.com.

Source: Pet Gazette
Image Source: Vet Times

Man Admits Charges after Dingle Dog Attack

A 35 year old man has admitted charges of owning dangerously out of control dogs after a toddler was the victim of a dog attack at the weekend.

Dog attack

The attack, in which a two year old girl suffered serious injuries to her head and body, took place outside a house in Dingle, Liverpool on Sunday 7 May. The toddler was playing in a relative’s front garden with two of her cousins when several American bully dogs managed to squeeze through a fence from next door.

A 57 year old woman, believed to be the child’s aunt, attempted to save her and was also injured in the dog attack.

The unnamed toddler is currently in a “serious but not life-threatening” at Alder Hey Childrens’ Hospital, having undergone surgery on Sunday night. The 57 year old was taken to the Royal Liverpool University Hospital with minor dog bite injuries on Sunday and was released later that day.

Guilty plea

Andrew McGowan, of Cockburn Street – where the attack took place, pleaded guilty to owning four dogs that were dangerously out of control at Liverpool and Knowsley Magistrates Court. The 35 year old has been bailed until 8 June.

According to police, five dogs and a further six puppies were seized following the attack. Two of the adult dogs have been humanely destroyed.

Merseyside Police – “horrific attack”

Chief Inspector Dave Westby, from Merseyside Police, said:

“This was a horrific attack which has resulted in a two-year-old girl suffering extensive injuries to her head and body.

“The child was playing in the back garden of a relative’s address with two other children when a number of dogs from a nearby house managed to get in to the garden.”

Police added that American bully dogs are not a banned breed.

Compensation following a dog attack – expert advice

If you have been attacked by a dog, even where the dog did not cause physical harm, you may be entitled to compensation. More information can be found via our ‘Dog Bite Claims’ page.

Whatever your experience involving a dangerous dog attack, speak to our expert team of personal injury solicitors today to discover how we could help you. For further information, call 0800 888 6 888 or email info@hampsonhughes.com.

Source: Liverpool Echo; BBC News; Express

Dog Handed ‘Suspended Death Sentence’ after Attack

Image of a white English bull terrier running on green grass towards the camera

A dog in Tyne and Wear has been handed a ‘suspended death sentence’ after it attacked another dog and its owner.

Incident

Sunderland Magistrates’ Court heard how the incident took place on June 24 of this year, as the victim and her partner walked their two small dogs in Rickleton Village Centre.

The Staffordshire bull terrier initially attempted to attack one of the victim’s dogs before biting the woman. Prosecutor Laura Lax also told the court that there were members of the public present at the time of the attack, including young children.

The victim suffered four puncture wounds to her upper right thigh, calf and buttock during the attack. She also had wounds and skin missing from both hands, and has reported being in ‘severe pain’ four months on.

Miss Lax went on to say:

“The witness states that a white Staffordshire bull terrier appeared out of nowhere and started attacking her dogs.

“She describes the dog as extremely aggressive and one of her dogs was bitten.”

Of the dog’s owner, Laura Golden, Miss Lax added:

“This defendant appeared and made no attempts to stop the dog attacking her.

“She eventually realised what was going on and hit the dog with a dog lead and shouted at it to ‘get home’.

“The dog was not on a lead at any time.”

‘No previous signs of aggression’

Sandra Fife, defending, told the court that the dog had been rescued after its previous owner could not afford to look after it. She added that previously, the dog had showed no signs of aggression.

Asking that the dog not be destroyed, Miss Fife produced an expert report from a vet:

“A suspended sentence for the dog is essentially what we are talking about here.

“This dog does not represent any more risk to public safety than any other well kept dog and with muzzle and a lead it will be negligible.”

Sentencing

Miss Golden, 24, of Rickleton Village Centre, admitted being the owner of a dog which ‘caused injury while dangerously out of control’.

The bench ordered that the dog must be secured on a lead at all times by someone over the age of sixteen. It was also ordered that the dog be muzzled or Miss Golden will have to have the dog destroyed.

Miss Golden was also fined a total of £120 and was told to pay £100 compensation to the victim. Additionally she was ordered to pay £43 for the vet’s fees, and £85 costs.

Dog attacks – expert advice

If you have been attacked by a dog, even where the dog did not cause physical harm, you may be entitled to compensation. More information can be found via our ‘Dog Bite Claims’ page.

Whatever your experience involving a dangerous dog attack, speak to our expert team of personal injury solicitors today to discover how we could help you. For further information, call 0800 888 6 888 or email info@hampsonhughes.com.

Source: Sunderland Echo

Pair Sentenced for Death of Child after Dog Attack

Image of a Staffordshire bull terrier pulling on a lead - relating to a dog attack incident

Last week the mother and grandmother of a six month old girl who was mauled to death by their family dog were jailed.

Incident

Molly Mae Wotherspoon was in the care of her Grandmother, Susan Aucott, 56, when the attack took place on 3 October 2014. Molly Mae’s mother, Claire Riley, 23, was on a night out with friends at the time of the incident.

The dog, an American Pitbull named Bruiser, escaped from a page in the kitchen and opened the door to the living room. Molly Mae was lying on a changing matt when the dog picked up the child by her head during the “sustained attack”. Northampton Crown Court heard how she suffered a fractured skull and bites to all four limbs, later dying of blood loss.

James House, prosecuting, said:

“He was an aggressive and dangerous dog and should not have been left in the house with a person who could not control him.

“The attack was sustained. Susan Aucott simply was unable to bring Bruiser under control or remove Molly Mae from the situation.”

House added that one vet who had treated Bruiser previously described him as “one of the most aggressive dogs she had ever seen”.

Sentencing

Aucott, of Northampton, was sentenced to two years in prison after admitting being in charge of a dangerously out of control dog. Riley, also of Northampton, admitted owning a dangerously out of control dog, was sentenced to two years in prison.

Mrs Justice Carr QC said:

“This was a tragic and totally avoidable incident.”

James Allen, head of the complex casework unit for the Crown Prosecution Service East Midlands, said after sentencing:

“Molly Mae’s death was a tragedy for all concerned.

“Sadly, the simple truth is that her death in October 2014 was entirely avoidable. Molly Mae’s death would not have happened if two of the people closest to her had acted, as any reasonable person would have done, and never allowed such an aggressive and dangerous dog to be in the same small house as a young and vulnerable child.”

Types of dangerous dog

The Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 introduced ‘breed specific legislation’ that bans the ownership, breeding, selling, or giving away of four types of dog:

• Fila Brasileiro
• Pit Bull Terrier
• Japanese Tosa
• Dogo Argentino

Breaching the legislation may result in a fine of up to £5,000 and a potential prison sentence of up to six months.

Dangerous dogs – police action

There are several circumstances under which the police may take action against a suspected dangerous dog:

• A report of a dog being encouraged to fight other dogs
• A report of a banned breed that has not been granted exemption
• A report of breeding, selling, abandoning, or giving away a banned breed
• A report that a dog has been dangerously out of control (i.e. causing or threatening injury)

There are an estimated 10 million pet dogs in the UK. If you think that you may be in possession of a banned breed, you may qualify for an “exemption” if the police deem that your animal does not pose a threat. Qualifying for an exemption involves a court procedure that may impose conditions such as muzzling in public.

Dog attacks – expert advice

If you have been attacked by a dog, even where the dog did not cause physical harm, you may be entitled to compensation. Whatever your experience involving a dangerous dog attack, speak to our expert team of personal injury solicitors today to discover how we could help you. For further information, call 0800 888 6 888 or email info@hampsonhughes.com.

Source: Guardian

Toddler Dies Following Dog Attack

Close up image of a white american bulldog relating to a dog attack

A three year old boy has died and a woman has been arrested, after the child was mauled to death by a dog at a house in Essex yesterday.

Second fatal attack this week

The incident is the second fatal dog attack to happen in the UK in just four days. 52 year old David Ellam died after being attacked by a neighbour’s dog in Huddersfield earlier this week.

Essex police were called to a residential street in Halstead at 5.40pm on Thursday, after neighbours heard screams coming from a property. The child, later named by police as Dexter Neal, was airlifted to Addenbrooke’s hospital in Cambridgeshire by East of England ambulance service; however he later died from his injuries.

According to Essex police, a 29 year old woman has been arrested for allowing a dog to be dangerously out of control and injuring a person. The dog in question, an American bulldog, has been detained in police kennels.

Calls for new licensing system

Labour MP Barry Sheerman, who represents Huddersfield, has called for a new system of dog licensing and a full inquiry following the death of the child. He told the Guardian:

“These two deaths in four days mean we have got to seriously look at the evidence of a proper licensing system for dogs. Other parts of the world do it so much better than us.”

He added:

“It should be mandatory. The old dog licence was not a proper licensing system, there were no real checks on the appropriateness of the home where the pet would be brought up. People are getting dogs and not looking after them properly, and we know there is a ghastly subculture of dog fighting up and down this country. We all know it happens, but it’s below the surface.

“Every dog should be examined in terms of its breed and appropriateness for the home it is going to go to. Licences should be refused if the home is deemed inappropriate.”

Types of dangerous dog

The Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 introduced ‘breed specific legislation’ that bans the ownership, breeding, selling, or giving away of four types of dog:

• Fila Brasileiro
• Pit Bull Terrier
• Japanese Tosa
• Dogo Argentino

Breaching the legislation may result in a fine of up to £5,000 and a potential prison sentence of up to six months.

Dangerous dogs – police action

There are several circumstances under which the police may take action against a suspected dangerous dog:

• A report of a dog being encouraged to fight other dogs
• A report of a banned breed that has not been granted exemption
• A report of breeding, selling, abandoning, or giving away a banned breed
• A report that a dog has been dangerously out of control (i.e. causing or threatening injury)

There are an estimated 10 million pet dogs in the UK. If you think that you may be in possession of a banned breed, you may qualify for an “exemption” if the police deem that your animal does not pose a threat. Qualifying for an exemption involves a court procedure that may impose conditions such as muzzling in public.

Dog attacks – expert advice

If you have been attacked by a dog, even where the dog did not cause physical harm, you may be entitled to compensation. Whatever your experience involving a dangerous dog attack, speak to our expert team of personal injury solicitors today to discover how we could help you. For further information, call 0800 888 6 888 or email info@hampsonhughes.com.

Source: Guardian; Hampson Hughes

Man Dies Following Dog Attack

Image of a white bull terrier with a grass background

A 52 year old man from Yorkshire has died after he was attacked by a dog that had only recently been returned to its owner, for fears it was dangerous.

Incident

52 year old David Ellam was taken to hospital by paramedics on Monday morning after police were called to the Sheepridge area of Huddersfield. Mr Ellam was pronounced dead at 9pm that evening at Huddersfield Royal infirmary.

The dog in question was seized by police in June this year after a number of complaints from the public, claiming the dog was dangerous. However, the dog was returned to its owners after it was found not to be a pit bull terrier, a breed banned under the Dangerous Dogs Act, but a female bull terrier.

Neighbours who witnessed the attack on Monday said that Mr Ellam was trying to protect his own dog, a terrier, when he was bitten on the head, arm and leg. He was left unconscious and when officers arrived at the scene, they had to use a fire extinguisher to fend off the bull terrier.

A 29 year old man, thought to be the owner of the bull terrier and Mr Ellam’s neighbour, has been arrested in relation to the incident.

IPCC Investigation

The incident has been referred to the independent police complaints commission. The IPCC will now decide if the dog, which is being detained in police kennels, will be returned to the owner.

Leading the investigation is DCI Mark Swift of West Yorkshire police’s homicide and major inquiry team. He said:

“Clearly our thoughts go out to the family at this tragic time. They are understandably devastated by what has happened and are being supported by specially trained officers.

“Our investigation is continuing. We believe that the victim was out with his own dog at the time of the attack near to his home address on Riddings Road. His dog, a Yorkshire terrier, was also injured during the incident and received emergency veterinary care.”

Types of dangerous dog

The Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 introduced ‘breed specific legislation’ that bans the ownership, breeding, selling, or giving away of four types of dog:

• Fila Brasileiro
• Pit Bull Terrier
• Japanese Tosa
• Dogo Argentino

Breaching the legislation may result in a fine of up to £5,000 and a potential prison sentence of up to six months.

Dangerous dogs – police action

There are several circumstances under which the police may take action against a suspected dangerous dog:

• A report of a dog being encouraged to fight other dogs
• A report of a banned breed that has not been granted exemption
• A report of breeding, selling, abandoning, or giving away a banned breed
• A report that a dog has been dangerously out of control (i.e. causing or threatening injury)

There are an estimated 10 million pet dogs in the UK. If you think that you may be in possession of a banned breed, you may qualify for an “exemption” if the police deem that your animal does not pose a threat. Qualifying for an exemption involves a court procedure that may impose conditions such as muzzling in public.

Dog attacks – expert advice

If you have been attacked by a dog, even where the dog did not cause physical harm, you may be entitled to compensation. Whatever your experience involving a dangerous dog attack, speak to our expert team of personal injury solicitors today to discover how we could help you. For further information, call 0800 888 6 888 or email info@hampsonhughes.com.

Source: Guardian; Hampson Hughes

Labrador Retriever | Most Likely Dog Breed to Bite

Image of a white Labrador retriever sitting in a grass field

When making a claim for compensation following a dog bite, individuals named the Labrador Retriever as the attacker more than any other breed.

Most likely dog breed to attack

According to new research from leading pet insurer, Animal Friends, the popular family pet is the most likely dog breed to attack.

The new figures also reveal that nearly a third of all dog bite compensation claims come from postal and delivery workers, with German Shepherds most likely to attack posties. Staffordshire Bull Terriers and Border Collies ranked second and third respectively, for attacks on postal workers.

Over half of all personal injury claims by delivery workers sited dogs not being kept secure as the main cause of attacks. In the majority of cases, incidents occurred when the dog has escaped through an open gate or pushed past its owner.

The NHS spends £20,000 each year on dog bite victims. Patients often require psychological treatment after an attack, as well as surgery that can include nerve grafts, pins and plates.

Dog bite claims – speak to the experts

You may be entitled to dog bite compensation if you have been injured in a dog attack. Whatever the circumstances of your claim, our expert team of personal injury solicitors may be able to help you to secure maximum personal injury compensation. Contact us today to discover how we could help you – remember, we offer a FREE no-obligation consultation.

For further information about dog bite compensation, speak to our dedicated team of solicitors today. Call our experts on 0800 888 6 888 or email info@hh-law.co.uk.

Source: Liverpool Echo

Dog Attacks | Merseyside is UK Hotspot for Second Time

Merseyside is named as the hotspot for dog attacks in the UK for the second time.

Liverpool and Dog Attacks

According to the Health and Social Care Information Centre, a total of 322 victims sought medical help for a dog attack in Merseyside in 2014/2015. This number of victims ranks Merseyside above Durham, Darlington and Tees and Thames Valley for dog attacks.

Liverpool and the surrounding areas have had an issue with dog attacks for a number of years now. Four-year-old John-Paul Massey from Wavertree was mauled to death in 2009, sparking calls for tougher dog laws. Other incidents include the death of pensioner Clifford Clarke, of Clubmoor, who was attacked by his neighbours’ starving presa canario.

PATHS

The newly released figures have prompted a number of individuals at the University of Liverpool to question why dog attacks are more common in Merseyside than anywhere else in the country.

The People, Animals and their Health in Society (PATHS) group at the university, led by Dr Rob Christley, Dr Francine Watkins, Dr Carri Westgarth and Professor Liz Perkins, plan to further analyse the issue. As part of the group’s “health in people and animals” programme, PATHS is working with Merseyside Police, Royal Mail and a number of agencies to consider how dog attack incidents are responded to and recorded.

Separately, a PhD programme jointly run by both the Dog’s Trust and the University of Liverpool are looking into how postal workers and the public can be protected from dog injuries. Merseyside Dog Safety Partnership will develop, coordinate and lead local efforts to lessen the number of dog bites and assess their impact.

Dr Christley said:

“Currently, we do not have enough information about how dog bites occur and the full effect they have on those who are injured.

“In the course of this work, we have identified that a wide range of agencies are involved in managing or preventing injuries arising from dogs. However, currently the extent to which these efforts are coordinated is limited.”

He added:

“An initial goal of this collaboration will be to identify key targets for intervention to minimise the risk and impacts of dog bites and to develop an essential method to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions.”

Dog attacks – speak to the experts

If you have been injured in a dog attack, you could be entitled to maximum personal injury compensation. We understand that you may have questions regarding your claim – that is why we offer you a FREE no-obligation consultation.

For further information about dog bite compensation, and to discover how we could help you, speak to our dedicated team of solicitors today on 0800 888 6 888 or email info@hh-law.co.uk.

Source: Liverpool Echo

Injury at Work | Star Wars Producers Plead Guilty to Safety Failings

The production company behind the latest Star Wars movie, Foodles Production (UK) Ltd, recently pleaded guilty to safety breaches following an incident of injury at work.

Injury on Set

The company’s guilty plea refers to an incident in which actor Harrison Ford suffered a serious injury at work. While filming Star Wars: The Force Awakens at Pinewood Studios in 2014, the actor became trapped underneath a metal door on the set of the Millennium Falcon. Mr Ford sustained a broken leg during the incident.

Appearing at Milton Keynes Magistrates Court on 26 July, Foodles admitted to ‘failing to protect actors and workers’. The production company pleaded guilty to two charges in total. Sentencing will take place later this year at Aylesbury Crown Court.

A spokesman for Health and Safety Executive said:

“During the filming of Star Wars Episode Seven: The Force Awakens, the actor Harrison Ford was badly injured after he became trapped under a rapidly closing metal-framed door. The power of the door’s drive system was comparable to the weight of a small car.

“This was a foreseeable incident. Foodles Production (UK) Ltd has accepted it failed to protect actors and staff and HSE welcomes the firm’s guilty plea.

“Every employer in every industry has a legal duty to manage risks in the workplace. Risks are part and parcel of everyday life, and this is acknowledged by health and safety law – but they still need to be identified and managed in a proportionate way.

“The British film industry has a world renowned reputation for making exceptional films. Managing on-set risks in a sensible and proportionate way for all actors and staff – regardless of their celebrity status – is vital to protecting both on-screen and off-screen talent, as well as protecting the reputation of the industry.”

Injury at Work – Expert Advice

If you have suffered an injury at work you could be entitled to personal injury compensation.

Remember, we offer you a FREE no-obligation consultation – discover today whether you have a claim. Speak to one of our professional and friendly advisers today on 0800 888 6 888 or email claims@hampsonhughes.co.uk.

Source: Health and Safety Executive; Hampson Hughes Solicitors

11 Children Bitten by Dog

Dog bites 11 children on park

11 children have been bitten by a Staffordshire bull terrier-type dog in Blyth, Northumberland. The incident occurred on May 18th at around 18:30PM. Three of the children spent the night in hospital, and one child – a seven year old girl – is expected to require skin grafts.

The dog was restrained by Adam Mulvey, father of one of the girls attacked by the dog. Mr Mulvey was able to use a cardigan to tie the dog to a fence.

Mr Mulvey said:

“I got a knock on the door from a little girl telling us that there
were several children trapped in the park with the dog,
and one of them was my little girl.”

“I could see her from the house and everyone else
screaming, howling, it was just horrific.”

“I’m a dog lover and it killed me to sit on it and hold its face to the
ground. But it was a powerful dog – not a nice thing to happen.”

Fiona Richards, a local resident whose daughter was bitten on the thigh during the attack, commented:

“The dog was running around super fast biting every kid in there,
I saw it grab a little one by the shoulder. It was bedlam.”

Neil Wilkson, also a local resident, said:

“There were about 30 kids in there and the dog just arrived from nowhere.
“I got in and started lifting them up and out of the park. As I was
doing it the dog leapt up and bit my son on the arm.”

Police arrested a 37 year old woman on suspicion of owning a dangerously out of control dog. Two further people who were helping the police with their investigation have been released on bail.

Dog bite claim – expert advice

If you have been injured in a dog attack, you may be entitled to maximum personal injury compensation. Hampson Hughes Solicitors specialises in securing personal injury compensation in claims involving dangerously out of control dogs. For further information, and to discover how we could help you, speak to our expert team of personal injury solicitors today.
Call 0800 888 6 888 or email info@hampsonhughes.com

Source:
bbc.co.uk