Tag: NHS compensation claims

Doctor suspended after miss diagnosis resulted in boy’s death

A Merseyside doctor who failed to spot sepsis which killed a young boy in December 2013 has his medical license suspended.

What Happened?

The boy, who suffered with complex health needs, was originally diagnosed with a chest infection by his GP, when his condition deteriorated he was admitted to Whiston Hospital.

He was first examined by the department’s clinical director, who suspected the child may have sepsis and a lower respiratory tract infection.

Dr Thiagarajan Sundaravadivelu, who was a locum registrar, took over the case at midnight and confirmed the nine-year-old had a minor chest infection, provided him with anti-biotics and discharged him. It was then six hours later that the patient died.

Investigation

The tribunal found Dr Sundaravadivelu did not adequately examine the boy, or take an adequate history from his mother before discharging him.

The locum registrar stopped working at Whiston Hospital shortly after the incident; he admitted that he had failed to do enough to diagnose the fatal condition.

The tribunal said his conduct would be regarded as deplorable by fellow practitioners, but added it was an isolated incident. After his suspension, the doctor will face a review before going back to work.

A spokeswoman for St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust said:

“The doctor was referred to the General Medical Council after the trust found failings in the care he provided to a patient.

“The GMC has decided to suspend him for four months. The doctor has not worked at the trust since soon after the incident.”

Medical Negligence Claims – Expert Advice

If you have been affected by medical negligence, and you would like expert advice, contact Hampson Hughes Solicitors Medical Negligence Team today on 0151 242 1025 or email medicalnegligence@hampsonhughes.com

Source: Liverpool Echo

Grandmother dies after heart valve was inserted wrong

Image of a medical professional writing notes next to a stethoscope and laptop

An investigation is set to probe heart valve patient Sheila Hynes’ death following routine surgery at Newcastle’s Freeman Hospital.

What happened?

The Great-grandmother from Newcastle sustained catastrophic internal bleeding after a heart valve was put in upside down. This caused irreversible damage during surgery which was led by consultant surgeon Asif Raza Shah.

A second operation performed to try and get her heart working failed and the 71 year old subsequently died a week later in intensive care.

Inquest

Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has acknowledged that the error caused Mrs Hynes’ death.

The five day inquest will be held at Newcastle’s Civic Centre.

Medical Negligence Claims – Expert Advice

If you have been affected by medical negligence, and you would like expert advice, contact Hampson Hughes Solicitors Medical Negligence Team today on 0151 242 1025 or email medicalnegligence@hampsonhughes.com

Source: Aol.com

Toddler Suffering from Stevens-Johnson Syndrome is Misdiagnosed

Three year old Joel Greaves nearly lost his life after doctors misdiagnosed what turned out to be a deadly rare disease as chicken pox.

Mistaken for chicken pox

Doctors first diagnosed the toddler with chicken pox, after he developed a condition that caused his skin to swell and blister. However, after Joel was left fighting for his life on a ventilator, doctors realised that he was in fact suffering from the very rare and life threatening skin condition, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome.

Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

Stevens-Johnson Syndrome is normally a reaction to medication or an infection. Doctors believe that Joel developed the condition as an allergic reaction to medication he was being given for croup. He was admitted to a specialist burns unit where his blistered skin was wrapped in bandages and his breathing supported with a ventilator. Doctors told his mother to prepare for the worst, however he was released from hospital after nine weeks.

Speaking of the ordeal, after which Joel has had to learn to walk, talk and eat again, his mother Tammy said:

‘Joel had suffered from chicken pox and his first symptoms of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome were spots all over his body.

‘He had suffered from chicken pox once before and the symptoms were very similar so we thought it was unlikely he
would have it for a second time – but we had no idea what else it could be.

‘That was until his whole body started to blister and his eyes were swollen shut.

‘Doctors soon realised Joel was actually suffering from a life-threatening allergic reaction, not chicken pox and we were left terrified as they battled to save our little boy.

‘They had no idea if he was going to survive as one-in-five die from the condition but we just had to hope and pray he’d pull through.

‘Joel was unrecognisable as his body was so swollen and he had to undergo an eight hour operation to remove all the dead skin.’

Miss Greaves went on to say:

‘I couldn’t be more thankful to all the hospital staff that saved Joel’s life, he was allowed home on December 8 and has minimal scars thanks to expert surgeons.

‘Joel was one of the lucky ones but if this condition isn’t diagnosed and treated quickly enough it can be fatal.’

Stevens-Johnsons Syndrome Awareness UK

Joel and his family are now receiving support from Stevens-Johnsons Syndrome Awareness UK, a charity that helps support those affected & spread awareness of the condition.

Founder of SJS Awareness UK, Thermutis Nadier Lawson said:

‘I am pleased little Joel’s eyes were not affected and he is making a good recovery.

‘We support those affected by providing them with an information pack to enlighten them about the condition as well as putting them in touch with others.’

Your medical misdiagnosis claim

Following a medical misdiagnosis, you could experience further symptoms and complications. Depending on your circumstances, we may be able to help you to access expert medical care and rehabilitation support as part of your claim. For further information on the types of rehabilitation that may be available, please see my rehabilitation.

Discover today whether you have a claim, call 0800 888 6 888 or email info@hh-law.co.uk

Source: Mail Online

Official figures show A&E delays in England reach record level

New data released by NHS England for January shows that just 88.7% of patients were seen within four hours of arriving in A&E, the NHS have a target percentage of 95%. That is the worst monthly performance since the target was introduced in 2004.

However, NHS England have said that due to the record demand levels also recorded for the same month, a performance dip was ‘not surprising’.

Record demand levels include overall attendances increased by over 10% compared to January 2015 and emergency admissions and calls to the NHS 111 non emergency number saw a sharp rise.

Other key issues

January’s monthly performance report also highlighted other areas the NHS is struggling with:

• Key target for cancer patients to start treatment within 62 days of an urgent referral from a GP was missed for the 20th time in 21 months
• The number of people waiting six weeks or longer for a diagnosis was twice the amount expected
• Second month in a row that the target for patients needing a routine operation to be seen was not hit
• One in three patients waited longer than eight minutes for an ambulance to arrive, the eighth month in a row this target has been missed
• NHS 111 failed to hit its target to answer calls within 60 seconds

Another continued problem is the delays in discharging patients, with the second highest number of delays on record occurring in January. Such delays result in a backlog of patients, which in turn has an effect on A&E services.
Richard Barker, from NHS England, said:

“Against this backdrop it’s not surprising hospitals saw a dip in their performance and it is credit to all those working in emergency care that we are still admitting, treating and discharging almost nine in 10 patients within four hours

“Winter pressures have come late this year with a sustained cold period and an increase in seasonal infections.”

Extreme measures

The BBC reported in January that hospitals are increasingly being forced to take extreme measures in order to cope. Such measures include reports of GPs being advised to cut down on the number of hospital referrals and makeshift emergency treatment rooms are being set up outside A&E waiting areas. There have even been reports of hospitals cancelling multiple routine operations at once.

Dr Cliff Mann, of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine, said:

“It is now routine for many staff to arrive at work faced with congested and overcrowded departments in which it is impossible to deliver best care.

“Similarly many leave work, hours after their agreed finish time, exhausted by the scale of the task.”

According to John Appleby, of the King’s Fund, the NHS was facing a “perfect storm”.

“Today’s figures underline the scale of the challenge for NHS trusts struggling to meet demand for services within current financial constraints.

“Most trusts are operating with very high bed occupancy which makes it difficult to respond to unexpected fluctuations in admissions. This is compounded by delays in discharging patients, which prevents beds being freed up for new patients. Today’s figures suggest it will be a long winter for the NHS.”

Your NHS Claim – Speak to the Experts

If you believe that your symptoms have been overlooked or mistreated due to negligence on behalf of a medical professional, contact us today. Hampson Hughes solicitors specialises in securing maximum personal injury compensation in cases of NHS claims.

Remember, we offer you a FREE no-obligation consultation. Even if you have since recovered fully from your injury or illness, we may be able to help you to claim rightful compensation. Call 0800 888 6 888 or email claims@hampsonhughes.com

Source: BBC News

Serious “Never Events” Still Occurring in NHS

NHS England has recorded almost 1,200 ‘unacceptable serious events’ that have occurred in hospitals over the past four years. Such errors, classified as “never events”, include objects being left inside bodies, falls through windows that were not properly secured, operations on the wrong patient and wrong limb and a kidney being removed instead of an ovary.

Steady Trend

The log of “never events” from the past four years, kept by NHS England, shows a relatively steady trend. Between April 2012 and March 2013, a total of 290 events were recorded, in 2013/2014 338 were recorded, in 2014/2015 there were 306. From April 2015 to December that same year, the last month of recorded figures, 254 incidents were recorded. However, this figure will be adjusted accordingly if and when there are further reports of “never events”.

In an interview with the Guardian last week, health secretary Jeremy Hunt stressed the need for healthcare staff to learn from their own mistakes, as well as those of others. Mr Hunt went on to say:

“I want to normalise openness and transparency.”

Over 1000 Errors Recorded

Errors that have been recorded include the removal of a fallopian tube instead of the patient’s appendix and the removal of an entire testicle instead of the cyst on it. In total for the year ending March 2015, there were 102 cases whereby a foreign object was left inside a body after a wound was stitched, 8 cases were the wrong eye was operated on and 27 cases in which the wrong tooth or teeth were removed. Within that same year there were four cases of misidentification of patients and two cases of a transferred prisoner escaping.

Over the past four years, in total, there have been over 420 patients who have suffered after having a foreign object left inside them after surgery. Objects include the likes of drill guides, swabs, scalpel blades, needles and gauzes.

There have been potentially fatal cases whereby feeding tubes have been inserted into a patient’s lungs instead of their stomach and more than 400 people have been left suffering due to “wrong site surgery”.

NHS England has also recorded cases within the last four years whereby the dosage of drugs given to a patient was too high. Other patients have suffered after being given the wrong type of joint replacement or implant and there have even been cases of patients receiving the wrong type of blood during a transfusion.

Hospital with Highest Number of Events

In terms of the number events that occur at each hospital trust, these are logged separately without any details of what the incident involves. For the year ending March 2015, with 9 events recorded in total, Colchester Hospital University NHS Foundation Trust had the highest number of “never events”.

A spokesperson for NHS England has said:

“One never event is too many and we mustn’t underestimate the effect on the patients concerned,

“However there are 4.6m hospital admissions that lead to surgical care each year and, despite stringent measures put in place, on rare occasions, these incidents do occur.

“To better understand the reasons why, in 2013 we commissioned a taskforce to investigate, leading to a new set of national standards being published last year specifically to support doctors, nurses and hospitals to prevent these mistakes. Any organisation that reports a serious incident is also expected to conduct its own investigation so it can learn and take action to prevent similar incidents from being repeated.”

Chief executive of the Patients Association, Katherine Murphy, said:

“It is a disgrace that such supposed ‘never’ incidents are still so prevalent. With all the systems and procedures that are in place within the NHS, how are such basic, avoidable mistakes still happening? There is clearly a lack of learning in the NHS.

“These patients have been very badly let down by utter carelessness. It is especially unforgivable to operate on the wrong organ, and many such mistakes can never be rectified.”

Your NHS Claim – Speak to the Experts

If you believe that your symptoms have been overlooked or mistreated due to negligence on behalf of a medical professional, contact us today. Hampson Hughes solicitors specialises in securing maximum personal injury compensation in cases of NHS claims. Remember, we offer you a FREE no-obligation consultation. Even if you have since recovered fully from your injury or illness, we may be able to help you to claim rightful compensation. Call 0800 888 6 888 or email claims@hampsonhughes.com

Source: The Guardian